Crisis Resources for Parents

Rearview of a little boy getting a big hug from his mom in the morning outside

Helping Your Child Cope with Tragedy & Loss

 

Our thoughts and prayers are with all those who are impacted by loss, tragedy or natural disasters.   We know that this is not enough.  Below are just a few resources to assist you.  See also the links to crisis response organization websites contributing these articles for more.  We hope they will be of some help and comfort as you support your children.

 

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Disaster Distress Helpline   Call 1-800-985-5990 or text “TalkWithUs” to 66746.

helplineThe Disaster Distress Helpline, 1-800-985-5990, can provide immediate counseling to anyone who needs help in dealing with the many issues and problems that might arise from tragedy and traumatic events.   Sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Helpline immediately connects callers to trained and caring professionals from the closest crisis counseling center in the nationwide network of centers. Helpline staff will provide confidential counseling, referrals, and other needed support services.  The Disaster Distress Helpline is a 24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week national hotline dedicated to providing disaster crisis counseling. The toll-free Helpline is confidential and multilingual, and available for those who are experiencing psychological distress as a result of natural or man-made disasters, incidents of mass violence, or any other tragedy affecting America’s communities.

Our texting service also is available to Spanish speakers. Text “Hablanos” to 66746 for 24/7 emotional support.    TTY for Deaf/Hearing Impaired: 1-800-846-8517


Helping Your Child Cope With Tragedy:  Resources by Age

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Helping Your Child Cope With Tragedy:  General Resources

A National Tragedy:  Helping Children Cope   National Association of School Psychologists

After the Trauma:  Helping My Child Cope  UCLA Center of Mental Health in Schools

Childhood Traumatic Grief Resources for Parents and Caregivers  National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Common Reactions After Trauma  The National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Coping with Crisis:  Helping Children with Special Needs  National Association of School Psychologists

Coping with a Traumatic Event  Center for Disease Control

Coping with Violence and Traumatic Events    Tips for parents in talking with their children by various age groups in English, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese.    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Guidelines for Working with Traumatized Children    UCLA Center of Mental Health in Schools

Helping Children Cope with Tragedy Related Anxiety  Mental Health America

Helping Children Cope  After a Traumatic Event   Child Mind Institute

How to Deal with Grief.   Explains how to deal with grief as a normal response to loss or death. Describes how grief feels, how long it lasts, the four-step grieving process, and how grief differs from depression. Lists resources for more information.   (SAMHSA)

Identifying Seriously Traumatized Children: Tips for Parents and Educators  National Association of School Psychologists

Managing Strong Emotional Reactions to Traumatic Events: Tips for Parents and Teachers    National Association of School Psychologists

Parent Information:  Protecting Your Child From Suicide  (English)   Trauma & Crisis Project from Brigham Young University

Tips for Supporting Children and Youth After a Crisis Event  National Association of School Psychologists

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Other Traumatic Event: Managing Stress  This publication provides easy to read stress prevention and management tips for dealing with the effects of trauma, mass violence, or terrorism; it lists tips to relieve stress, describes how to know when to seek professional help, and provides accompanying resources. (4 pages). Source:  SAMHSA

Tips for Survivors of a Traumatic Event – Managing Your Stress    Gives stress prevention and management tips for dealing with the effects of trauma, mass violence, or terrorism. Lists tips to relieve stress, describes how to know when to seek professional help, and provides accompanying resources.

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Traumatic Event: What to Expect in Your Personal, Family, Work, and Financial Life   This publication offers self-help tips for coping with the aftermath of trauma; it discusses the long-term impact of trauma, including personal uncertainties, family relationship changes, work disruptions, and financial concerns.SAMHSA

Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event     Helps parents and teachers recognize common reactions children of different age groups (preschool and early childhood to adolescence) experience after a disaster or traumatic event. Offers tips for how to respond in a helpful way and when to seek support. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service.  Administration (SAMHSA)


Crisis Resources in Different Languages

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Responding After a School or Community Shooting

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Responding to Natural Disasters:

College Students: Coping After the Hurricane  The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Help Your Child After a Natural Disaster  (Spanish)  Trauma & Crisis Project from Brigham Young University

Help Your Child After a Natural Disaster  (English)   Trauma & Crisis Project from Brigham Young University

Helping Your Child After a Natural Disaster
Document available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Hmong, Haitian Creole, Tagalog, Tongan, Croatian, and Japanese   Translations provided to SSWAA by Melissa Allen Heath,   PhD, Brigham Young University

Document also available in  Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Hmong, Haitian Creole, Tagalog, Tongan, Croatian, and Japanese   Translations provided  by Melissa Allen Heath, PhD,  Trauma & Crisis Project at Brigham Young University

Helping Children After a Natural Disaster: Information for Parents and Teachers  Developed by the National Association of School Psychologists.

Hurricane Tools and Resources.    Resources for parents and caregivers developed by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network


Responding to Media Coverage:

Helping Your Child Cope with Media Coverage After a Disaster  Parent Guide.  Terrorism and Disaster Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Tips for Parents on Media Coverage    National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Tip Sheet for Youth Talking to Journalists about the Shooting  National Child Traumatic Stress Network


Preparing Your Family for an Emergency

Every Minute Counts in disaster.  Make an emergency plan for you and your family.  But preparing for emergencies shouldn’t fall on your shoulders alone. Young children and teens alike need to be part of the process — for their own safety and sense of empowerment.

Build a Kit,  Make a Plan,  Get Informed.    FEMA provides guidelines to help your family prepare for an emergency.

“Get Your Kids on Your Team”   Helpful information to involve your kids with emergency preparedness developed by FEMA for kids.

FEMA provides Family Communication Plans you can complete as a family and keep with you with important contact information as well as suggestions for communication if you are separated.  Family Communication Plan for Kids.     Family Communication Plan for Parents.

“The Safest Place During a Tornado”     Watch this entertaining and educational video by The Weather Channel.