Suicide Prevention & Intervention

Young woman student under stress at school, thinking about her problems with her head to the wall.“Suicide is a serious public health problem that can have lasting harmful effects on individuals, families, and communities. While its causes are complex and determined by multiple factors, the goal of suicide prevention is simple: Reduce factors that increase risk (i.e. risk factors) and increase factors that promote resilience (i.e. protective factors). Ideally, prevention addresses all levels of influence: individual, relationship, community, and societal. Effective prevention strategies are needed to promote awareness of suicide and encourage a commitment to social change.”  Center for Disease Control and Prevention


Do You Need Help?  Call a Suicide Lifeline:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK or 1-800-273-8255
Suicide Prevention Center Hotline:  1-877-7-CRISIS or 1-877-727-4747
Trevor Lifeline – LGBTQ 1-866-488-7386
Teen Line 1-800-TLC-TEEN or 1-800-852-8336
Veterans & Military Families 1-800-273-8255 Press 1


RESOURCES:

“A systematic review of the relationship between internet use, self-harm and suicidal behaviour in young people: The good, the bad and the unknown”   “Research exploring internet use and self-harm is rapidly expanding amidst concerns regarding influences of on-line activities on self-harm and suicide, especially in young people. We aimed to systematically review evidence regarding the potential influence of the internet on self-harm/suicidal behaviour in young people.”  “Forty-six independent studies (51 articles) of varying quality were included.”  Read findings. Source:  Marchant A, Hawton K, Stewart A, Montgomery P, Singaravelu V, Lloyd K, et al. (2017). PLoS ONE 12(8): e0181722

“After a suicide: A toolkit for schools” This toolkit is designed to assist schools in the aftermath of a suicide (or other death) in the school community. It is meant to serve as a practical resource for schools facing real-time crises to help them determine what to do, when, and how. The toolkit reflects consensus recommendations developed in consultation with a diverse group of national experts, including school-based personnel, clinicians, researchers, and crisis response professionals.  Source:  Suicide Prevention Resource Center

“After an Attempt:  Guide for Taking Care of Yourself After Your Treatment in the Emergency Department”  Source:   Department of Health & Human Services, 2009.  (19 pages)

American Association of Suicidology   “AAS is a membership organization for all those involved in suicide prevention and intervention, or touched by suicide. AAS is a leader in the advancement of scientific and programmatic efforts in suicide prevention through research, education and training, the development of standards and resources, and survivor support services.”

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention    “AFSP is the nation’s leading organization bringing together people across communities and backgrounds to understand and prevent suicide, and to help heal the pain it causes. ” “AFSP is a voluntary health organization that gives those affected by suicide a nationwide community empowered by research, education and advocacy to take action against this leading cause of death.”

“Be That One”  How peers and others can respond when someone may be suicidal.   Although this resource is directed towards students at the University of Texas at Ausin, the guidelines could be applied to other school settings.  Source:  University of Texas at Austin

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Information regarding Suicide statisticsUnderstanding Suicide Fact Sheet,   Suicide Prevention Strategies as well as “Effective and Promising Programs” and much more.

“Finding Suicide Programs, Practices & Resources”   “This searchable repository provides information on several types of suicide prevention programs, such as education/training, screening, treatment, and environmental change…including ‘Programs with Evidence of Effectiveness’ ”    Source:  Suicide Prevention Resource Center; SAMHSA

“Healthy Mind & Body: A Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Guide”   We typically do not post guides that are used as a means of “marketing”.   While NYSSSWA does not endorse     Given the seriousness of suicide and the recent “13 Reasons Why”, we felt it important to share this guide that provides a lot of good information as well as numerous resource links.

“Los Angeles County Youth Suicide Prevention Project”  While this resource comes from Los Angeles, the website of this project has separate sections for school administrators, school staff, parents, and students. Each section contains information sheets, videos, and other helpful resources. The website also has links to resources on a variety of at-risk populations and special issues in suicide prevention.

National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and  Practices.  NREPP is a searchable online registry of more than 400 interventions supporting mental health promotion, substance abuse prevention, and mental health and substance abuse treatment.   Search by setting, age, area of interest, etc.

OK2Talk.     “The goal of OK2TALK is to create a community for teens and young adults struggling with mental health problems and encourage them to talk about what they’re experiencing by sharing their personal stories of recovery, tragedy, struggle or hope. Anyone can add their voice by sharing creative content such as poetry, inspirational quotes, photos, videos, song lyrics and messages of support in a safe, moderated space.”    Source:   National Alliance on Mental Illness

“Preventing Suicide: A Technical Package of Policy, Programs, and Practices”  This technical package is based on the best available evidence to help communities and states sharpen their focus on prevention activities .  Strategies include: strengthening economic supports; strengthening access and delivery of suicide care;  creating protective environments; promoting connectedness; teaching coping and problem-solving skills; identifying and supporting people at risk; and lessening harms and preventing future risk.  2017 (62 pages). Source:  Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   

“Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools  Assists high schools and school districts in designing and implementing strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health. Includes tools to implement a multi-faceted suicide prevention program that responds to the needs and cultures of students.  Source:  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

“Prevent Youth Suicide:  Tips for Parents & Educators. “   Source:  National Association of School Psychologists

“The Role of High School Teachers in Preventing Suicide”      Pdf flier providing facts, tips and resources for teachers.  (7 pages)  Source:  Suicide Prevention Resource Center

“Save a Friend: Tips for Teens to Prevent Suicide”    Source:  National Association of School Psychologists

SOS, Signs of Suicide.    Providing tools to help youth identify the signs and symptoms of depression, suicide, and self-injury in themselves and their peers

Suicide Prevention Resource Center.    SPRC serves individuals, groups, and organizations that play important roles in suicide prevention:  SPRC creates resources on a variety of topics of interest including publications, online and printed toolkits, fact sheets, guides, and many types of training.

The Trevor Project:  Founded in 1998 by the creators of the Academy Award-winning short film TREVOR, The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people ages 13-24.

Books and Films for LGBTQ Young People.   17 pages of resources.  Source:  Trevor Project

“Youth Suicide Prevention, Intervention, and Postvention Guidelines:  A Resource for School Personnel”  Developed to assist schools and school administrators in developing comprehensive suicide prevention, intervention and postvention guidelines and policies.    (85 pages)  Source: Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, an Office of the Department of Health and Human Services.  2009