SSW: Racism & Social Justice

Resources Addressing Racism and Social Justice

In light of ongoing protests and calls for justice, we have compiled just a few resources.  Let us know of others we should share with school social workers.


Position Statement

SSWAA:  Solidarity Statement Black Lives Matter   Source: 6/1/2020. School Social Work Association of America.   NYSSSWA Signed on.


Articles:

6 Ways District Leaders Can Build Racial Equity   Source:  Samuels, C., 6/18/2020, Education Week.  

A Guide to Equity and Antiracism for Educators  “Teachers shaken by recent events and wondering how to work for change in our society and schools can start with these lesson plans, videos, and other resources.”  Source:  Nichols, H. 6/5/2020, Edutopia

Anti-racism resources.   List of books, videos, podcasts, films, TV series and resources.  Source:   Flicker, S., & Klein, A., 5/2020

Guidelines for Discussing Incidents of Hate, Bias, and Discrimination.   Source:  University of Michigan, Center of Research on Learning and Teaching

Lessons for Early Childhood & Elementary Students.    Includes suggested  teaching ideas, teaching guides, films, stories, books,  for Early Childhood and Elementary School students    Source:  Teaching for Change

Lessons for Middle & High School Students   Includes suggested  teaching ideas, teaching guides, films, stories, books,  for Middle and High School students    Source:  Teaching for Change

“No, I Am Not OK.”  Thanks for Asking    Source:  Lester, N., 6/16/2020 Teaching Tolerance

Racial Justice in Education.   (80 pages)  Source:  National Education Association-Human & Civil Rights

Reflecting on George Floyd’s Death and Police Violence Towards Black Americans   Source:  Facing History and Ourselves

Sesame Street: Best moments from CNN and Sesame Street’s town hall on racism for kids and parents.   Source:  Asmelash, L. 6/6/2020. CNN/Sesame Street

Talking With Students About Ferguson and Racism  Source:  Melville, K. 12/2/2014 Teaching Tolerance

Talks to Help You Understand Racism in America     Source:  TED talks

Teaching 6-Year-Olds About Privilege and Power    Source:  Schwartz, K., 9/17/2019, Mind/Shift

These Books Can Help You Explain Racism and Protest to Your Kids    Source:  Grose,  J.,  6/2/2020.  The New York Times

“What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”  Source:  Frederick Douglass, 7/5/1852  Teaching American History

When Educators Understand Race and Racism  Source:  Anderson, M. 11/24/2014  Teaching Tolerance


Websites:

#8 Can’t Wait

American Civil Liberties Union 

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter at Schools    Provides several resources and classroom activities to assist in talking about race.  Source:  National Education Association

Facing History and Ourselves:  Educator Resources 

Justice League NYC   “A multi-disciplinary task force of juvenile and criminal justice experts, artists, educators, direct service providers, activists, and formerly incarcerated individuals, brought together under the auspices of The Gathering for Justice, a social justice organization founded by Harry Belafonte.Operating as a coalition, members conjoin their areas of expertise and resources in an intentional effort to reform the criminal and social justice system in New York City, California, and across the world.”

Latino Justice   “For more than 40 years LatinoJustice has acted as an advocate against injustices throughout New York and beyond.”

National Immigration Law Center    “Established in 1979, the National Immigration Law Center (NILC) is one of the leading organizations in the U.S. exclusively dedicated to defending and advancing the rights of immigrants with low income.”

Rethinking Schools

Southern Poverty Law Center 

Teaching Tolerance   “Teaching Tolerance provides free resources to educators—teachers, administrators, counselors and other practitioners—who work with children from kindergarten through high school. These resources include classroom lessons, webinars, grants, podcasts, policy guides and much more. Educators use our materials to supplement the curriculum, to inform their practices, and to create civil and inclusive school communities where children are respected, valued and welcome participants.”